A biography of wilma glodean rudolph

She was a teenager before she even learned what the Olympics were. Rudolph caught on fast, though. In four seasons of high school track meets, she never lost a race.

A biography of wilma glodean rudolph

Wilma Rudolph - IMDb

She was a teenager before she even learned what the Olympics were. Rudolph caught on fast, though. In four seasons of high school track meets, she never lost a race.

A biography of wilma glodean rudolph

At the tender age of sixteen, she qualified for the Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, and came home with a bronze medal. Rudolph entered Tennessee State University in the fall ofwith the intention of majoring in elementary education.

Look Up Quick Results Now! Find Related Search and Trending Suggestions ashio-midori.come Results · Results · Answers · Trusted AdviceService catalog: Today's Answers, Online Specials, Compare Results, Search by Category. Wilma Rudolph became an instant celebrity in Europe and America. Crowds gathered wherever she was scheduled to run. She was given ticker tape parades, an official invitation to the White House by President John F. Kennedy (–), and a dizzying round of Died: Nov 12, Wilma Rudolph is credited as Athlete track and field, Olympic athlete,. Wilma Rudolph (also known as: Wilma Glodean Rudolph,/b>) born June 23, in Bethlehem, Tennessee, United States - died November 12, in Nashville.

All of her spare time was consumed by running, however. The pace took its toll, and she found herself too ill to run through most of the season.

She rebounded inonly to pull a muscle at a crucial meet between the United States and the Soviet Union, the former country made up of Russia and several smaller nations. Ed Temple, who would prove to be a lifelong friend, supervised her recovery, and by Rudolph was ready to go to Rome, Italy.

At the Olympics, Rudolph won all three of her gold medals in very dramatic fashion. In both the meter dash and the meter dash, she finished at least three yards in front of her closest competitor.

She tied the world record in the meter and set a new Olympic record in the Rudolph also brought her meter relay team from behind to win the gold.

The French called her "La Gazelle. After the fame Wilma Rudolph became an instant celebrity in Europe and America. Crowds gathered wherever she was scheduled to run.

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Kennedy —and a dizzying round of dinners, awards, and television appearances. Rudolph made one decision that she stuck to firmly: She felt that she might not be able to duplicate her achievement ofand she did not want to appear to be fading. She retired from amateur athletics infinished her college work, and became a school teacher and athletic coach.

She also became a mother, raising four children on her own after two divorces. Talent didn't go to waste For more than two decades, Wilma Rudolph sought to impart the lessons she learned about amateur athletics to other young men and women. She was the author of an autobiography, Wilma, which was published in —and the subject of a television movie based on her book.

She lectured in every part of America and even served in as an ambassador to the European celebration of the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, the wall that for three decades separated East from West Berlin, Germany. Rudolph helped to open and run inner-city sports clinics and served as a consultant to university track teams.

She also founded her own organization, the Wilma Rudolph Foundation, dedicated to promoting amateur athletics. She traveled frequently and was well known for her motivational speeches to youngsters. She is survived by two sons, two daughters, six sisters, two brothers, and a truly inspirational legacy.

Wilma Rudolph Biography - Famous People Biographies

For More Information Coffey, Wayne.Wilma Glodean Rudolph was born prematurely on June 23, , in St. Bethlehem, Tennessee, the 20th of 22 children born to dad Ed across his two marriages. Wilma Rudolph, Self: Olympic Games: Wilma Glodean Rudolph (June 23, - November 12, ) was an American track and field sprinter, who competed in the and meters dash.

Rudolph was considered the fastest woman in the world in the s and competed in two Olympic Games, in and in In the Summer Olympics in Rome, Rudolph became the first American Born: Jun 23, Look Up Quick Results Now! Find Related Search and Trending Suggestions ashio-midori.come Results · Results · Answers · Trusted AdviceService catalog: Today's Answers, Online Specials, Compare Results, Search by Category.

For more than two decades, Wilma Rudolph sought to impart the lessons she learned about amateur athletics to other young men and women.

She was the author of an autobiography, Wilma, which was published in —and the subject of a television movie based on her ashio-midori.com: Nov 12, Wilma Rudolph [1] American track and field athlete Wilma Rudolph made Olympic history in when she became the first American woman ever to win three gold medals in track and field events.

Wilma Rudolph Wilma Glodean Rudolph was born on June 23, to Ed and Blanche Rudolph. She was born in St. Bethlehem, Tennessee and raised in Clarksville, Tennessee. Wilma was born prematurely at 4. 5 pounds, the 20th of 22 other brothers and sisters.

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