Newlywed communication

Communication As a newlywed myself, I can relate on these difficult times that occur during the first few months and even the first few years of marriage.

Newlywed communication

After all, living with someone and being united with them requires new levels of patience, understanding, and self-control. When a co-worker upsets you, the disagreement is generally superficial, the boss will step in, or you can simply leave to take a breather and have an escape at home.

The same is true when arguments arise with friends or extended family members. But, when you argue with your spouse, the rules change, so here are a few things to keep in mind: Look for Visual Cues — Did you know that more than ninety percent of what you say does not come from your mouth?

It has been found that Newlywed communication is the non-verbal actions of a person that provide most of the story. If you are failing to look at your partner when he or she is speaking, then chances are good that you are missing much of what has been said. It is also much easier to misinterpret something that is said if you do not see the non-verbal communications associated with the words.

Actively Listen — In addition to looking at him or her during the conversation, it is very essential to demonstrate that you were, in fact, listening and hearing everything that was said. Rather than just nodding your approval of what your partner has said, or starting on a tirade regarding everything you disagree with, be careful to respond meaningfully to those questions.

These can be instant diffusers if handled correctly in a heated situation. Communication is essential, but sometimes it is just as important to know when to walk away. When tempers are flared to a level that distracts from hearing and understanding what is being said, then it is a good idea to take a moment to breathe.

At that point, return to your spouse and try to speak at a reasonable volume about what is bothering you. The communication foundations you lay today will affect your relationship for a lifetime, so take the time to figure out the best ways to discuss highly charged topics and deal with confronting each other in a loving way.

Newlywed communication

It will pay off, I promise! Just reading this blog post is a great step towards continuing your newlywed bliss. What discoveries have you made about communication as a newlywed?Research shows that 55% of communication is conveyed by the body language we use, that is use of eye contact, gestures, and facial expressions.

38% is conveyed through voice, its quality, use of tone, and inflections. Newlywed Communication Ashley Metz COM Interpersonal Communication Instructor Tremika Pinckney December 10, Newlywed Communication Being married, like being a parent, is one of the most rewarding relationships that you can have in life.

The Best Marriage Advice from Newlyweds. Communication.

Newlywed Communication: 3 Tips for Success | Newlywed Blog

Communicate with him clearly because he won’t read your mind. 3.

This quick newlywed etiquette guide will help you navigate those first few years together, through thick and thin. communication skills in newlywed couples. Master of Science (Communication Studies), May , 68 pp., 4 tables, references, titles. This study examined the effects of premarital counseling on newlywed communication. It was predicted that individuals who had participated in premarital counseling would have lower. Most couples say that they only spend a few minutes talking with their newlywed husband or wife, even if they have similar work schedules. They get home, make dinner, and then go to their respective ends of the house. She may be working out or chatting online, while he may be watching sports or tinkering in the garage.

Sex. Don’t listen to your friends when they tell you sex is overrated. 4. Have fun. Don’t be too busy or uptight to dance in the rain or jump in the pool with your clothes on – or off! 5. Covenant. Newlywed Communication: 3 Tips for Success Many newlyweds struggle to find the balance of listening and being heard in the first years of their marriage.

After all, living with someone and being united with them requires new levels of patience, understanding, and self-control. Being in a long distance relationship helped us to sharpen our communication skills.

When we were finally in the same city, though, and living under the same roof, we both realized that there was a lot more to communicating than just conversation. Here’s what I’ve discovered about communicating as a newlywed: Compromise is necessary. This quick newlywed etiquette guide will help you navigate those first few years together, through thick and thin.

10 Things About Marriage You Wish You'd Known As a Newlywed